Blog Archives

You Owe Me What was Always Mine

“You owe me what was always mine” is the title of Briayna Cuffie’s latest blog post on reparations4slavery.com. She is speaking to enslavers whose family records, letters, journals, photos, plantation accounts, etc. contain valuable information about the men, women, and

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Finding documents & doing research, Healing, repair & action, History & culture: people, places & events, Linked Descendants, Slavery & its legacies

Remembering Our Enslaver Ancestors: Which Facts Define Them? A Look at the Differing Viewpoints of the Descendants

In December 2020, Eric Kolenich of the Richmond Times-Dispatch interviewed several descendants of President John Tyler. He was prompted to write about them and their ancestor when John Tyler Community College began to consider changing its name, and his conversations

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in History & culture: people, places & events, Linked Descendants

The Gwynn’s Island Project Reconnects the Descendants of Black Island Families to their Roots

  Maria Montgomery found me on Ancestry.com in 2016. Our family trees overlap because my ancestors enslaved hers. We are “linked descendants”—cousins regardless of whether we share DNA. She asked if I had any probate records that might list people

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Finding documents & doing research, Healing, repair & action, Linked Descendants, Slavery & its legacies

Healing Historic Harms Through Research — Sharon Leslie Morgan

Sharon Leslie Morgan moved to Noxubee County, Mississippi to research her ancestors’ history. Morgan’s great-great-grandmother, Betty Warfe Gavin, was enslaved there, and gave birth to 17 children. The father of all of them was Robert Louis Gavin, a white man

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Finding documents & doing research, History & culture: people, places & events, Linked Descendants, Slavery & its legacies

BitterSweet ReLaunch!

Dear BitterSweet Readers and Writers: We are pleased to announce the re-launch of BitterSweet: Linked Through Slavery, a blog hosted by the Linked Descendants Working Group and Coming to the Table (CTTT.) Linked descendants have a joint history in slavery–a

Posted in Linked Descendants

Cast In Bronze

by Trina Michelle Robinson I’ve always been fascinated by migration stories. Hearing the details about why a person left the place of their birth to settle somewhere new always satisfied my love of storytelling and origin stories. Perhaps I was

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Linked Descendants

“There was Nothing We Could Do About it”

By Antoinette Broussard When I was a child, Uncle George’s stories and the serious inflection in his voice always commanded my attention. He frequently told me about my maternal great-grandmother, Violet Craig Turner, who had been enslaved until 1865 by

Tagged with: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Finding documents & doing research, Healing, repair & action, Linked Descendants, Slavery & its legacies

Spontaneous Eruptions

Dedicated to Susan Hutchison, Co-Founder, Coming to the Table Written by Pam Smith and Ann Neel Publication facilitated by Prinny Anderson  As all of us in CTTT know, honest communication between blacks and whites has historically been fraught with difficulty.

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in Linked Descendants

To Honor the Dishonorable

There is a problem I have been wrestling with for many years. One of the refrains I hear over and over among people working for racial reconciliation is the necessity of honoring the ancestors and the insistence that the ancestors

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Linked Descendants, Slavery & its legacies

Brattonsville Experience

Story by Quest Whalen, Class of 2019, Tuskegee University, submitted kindness of Dr. Lisa Bratton, Professor, Tuskegee University Dr. Bratton shared Ms. Whalen’s essay soon after their overnight at Historic Brattonsville on Friday, September 12, and participation in “By the

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in History & culture: people, places & events, Linked Descendants
Follow BitterSweet on WordPress.com